Seinfeld returning to the EKU Center for the Arts

Jerry Seinfeld returns to the Eastern Kentucky University Center for the Arts on May 9. © Photo courtesy of the EKU Center.

Jerry Seinfeld returns to the Eastern Kentucky University Center for the Arts on May 9. © Photo courtesy of the EKU Center.

Comedian Jerry Seinfeld is bringing his stand-up routine back to the Eastern Kentucky University Center for the Arts on May 9.

Seinfeld’s first appearance at the EKU Center came in its first fall of operation, 2011. According to an EKU Center news release, that show filled the 2,100-seat concert hall to capacity.

Seinfeld is of course known for his eponymous NBC sitcom that dominated Thursday nights through most of the 1990s. Now, like many other entertainers, Seinfeld’s main venue is the Internet, where he has a hit web series with Comedians in Cars Getting CoffeeThe show features Seinfeld, an unabashed car enthusiast and collector, picking up comedian friends in specially selected rides to go get a cup of joe and talk about their lives and careers. Among them are Howard Stern in a 1969 Pontiac GTO, because like the shock jock it does not go quietly, or Seth Meyers in a no-nonsense 1973 Porsche 911 Carrera RS.

Tickets for Seinfeld’s EKU show at 7 p.m. May 9 go on sale at 9 a.m. March 28.

This weekend, the EKU Center presents the touring production of Mamma Mia. Click here to read about the Lafayette High School graduate in the production.

 

 

Share
Posted in Eastern Kentucky University | Tagged , | Comments Off

Video: Lexington Ballet’s ‘Snow White’

The last time the Lexington Ballet presented Snow White was 2006. Artistic director Luis Dominguez says his company has made some mighty strides forward since then and has put together a completely new production with new choreography and music by everyone’s favorite Finn, Jean Sibelius.

Dominguez introduces the ballet in the video above, and at LexGo, we talk to the dancers playing the evil queen about being the villain.

Share
Posted in ballet, Lexington Ballet, Lexington Opera House | Tagged , , , | Comments Off

Morgan Freeman coming to UK

Oscar-winning actor Morgan Freeman will be at the University of Kentucky on April 14 to discuss his career in an event presented by the University of Kentucky College of Dentistry.

Morgan Freeman speaks on stage at the 25th annual Producers Guild of America  Awards at the Beverly Hilton Hotel on Sunday, Jan. 19, 2014, in Beverly Hills, Calif. © Photo by John Shearer for Invision for Producers Guild, via AP.

Morgan Freeman speaks on stage at the 25th annual Producers Guild of America Awards at the Beverly Hilton Hotel on Sunday, Jan. 19, 2014, in Beverly Hills, Calif. © Photo by John Shearer for Invision for Producers Guild, via AP.

Freeman, who was born in Memphis, Tenn., and grew up in Mississippi, has enjoyed a film career stretching back more than four decades, starting with roles on the daytime drama Another World and the PBS children’s show The Electric Company. Freeman’s best-known film roles include Hoke in Driving Miss Daisy (1989), Red in The Shawshank Redemption (1994) and Nelson Mandela in Invictus (2009), all of which earned him Oscar nominations. He won the Oscar for best supporting actor in Million Dollar Baby (2004) for his performance as Scrap, the boxing trainer assistant who first believes in Maggie (Hilary Swank), the budding fighter at the center of the film. He also narrated the movie and is the voice of many films, commercials and other endeavors, including the Oscar-winning documentary March of the Penguins (2005).

Freeman’s appearance at 7 p.m. in the Singletary Center for the Arts concert hall is to benefit the Drs. Nero and Biggerstaff Diversity Scholarship Fund. Tickets are $50 general public and $30 for UK Students. UK student tickets are only available in person at the box office.

Share
Posted in Film, Oscars, Singletary Center for the Arts, UK | Tagged , | Comments Off

‘Justified’ recap: ‘Weight’

 Jeremy Davies as Dickie Bennett and  Timothy Olyphant as Deputy U.S. Marshal Raylan Givens in the 10th episiode of Season 5 of "Justified," "Weight." © FX photos by Prashant Gupta.

Jeremy Davies as Dickie Bennett and Timothy Olyphant as Deputy U.S. Marshal Raylan Givens in the 10th episiode of Season 5 of “Justified,” “Weight.” © FX photos by Prashant Gupta.

Everybody is getting a little frustrated as Season 5 of Justified winds down. Things aren’t going too well for any of our criminals — Boyd (Walton Goggins), Ava (Joelle Carter) and Daryl (Michael Rapaport) — and lead lawman Raylan Givens (Timothy Olyphant) isn’t having much fun either.

That’s the sense you get when Raylan pays a visit to Daryl and Wendy (Alicia Witt) and hauls off and beats Daryl with his “pleather” attache case rather than take any lip from him. It sets the tone for the episode, Weight, which ratchets up the action for this season, but puts the guns down in favor of hand-to-hand combat.

As the show opens, everyone is on edge because Dewey (Damon Herriman) has run off with an AMC Pacer full of heroin, a large chunk of the shipment Boyd and company spent the last several episodes getting out of Mexico. Dewey thinks he has a hot hand to play, but it soon becomes clear that, well, he’s Dewey. When we get to the scene where he visits his “last friend” and it’s Justified’s other village idiot, Dickie Bennett (Jeremy Davies), we know he’s pretty much done.

That is one of two major guest stars on this episode, and the negotiation between Dickie and Raylan for information about Dewey’s whereabouts, including Dickie drawing Raylan a very colorful “map” is priceless.

The other guest star is Oscar-winner Mery Steenburgen as Katherine, an old associate of Wynn’s (Jere Burns) who is supposed to help him work out his associations with Boyd, which seem to have gone terribly wrong, and Picker (John Kapelos), who is really frustrated with Wynn’s continuing affinity for Boyd. Steenburgen’s career is filled with sweet characters, but we get the impression the moment she suggests sinking an icepick into Wynn’s neck and softly demanding $50,000 for her services that Katherine is about as sweet as Mags Bennett.

But far from talk, there is quite a bit of action in this episode.

As we start, Ava is faced with the prospect of having to kill her protector Judith (Dale Dickey) to open up the heroin flow in prison. That leads her to break things off with Boyd, who appears to be on the verge of a breakthrough in trying to get her out. But she knows she may very well be up on prison murder charges soon, so she waves him off. Later, Boyd gives up on a half-hearted attempt to get Harlan jail guard Albert (Danny Strong) to confess he framed Ava.

Walton Goggins as Boyd Crowder.

Walton Goggins as Boyd Crowder.

Intellectually, it appears Ava and Boyd may have given up on each other. But in the context of the series, that seems doubtful.

Ava tries to take the high road with Judith, saying she doesn’t like Rowena’s (Deidrie Henry) rule-changing ways. But Judith goes ahead and attacks her in a chair-wielding fight that Ava walks away from. Will she be able to conceal her involvement, and what’s the next bad thing to happen for Ava?

The most brutal scene is what happens to Danny (A.J. Buckley), who had the worst episode of anyone. It starts when his beloved dog Chelsea gets hit by a car while Kendal (Jacob Lofland) has him out for a walk, prompting Kendal to flee back to his social worker Alison (Amy Smart). Danny is also feeling the wrath of Daryl over the botched heroin shipment. Then, when Kendal returns and reveals Chelsea was killed on his watch, in the ensuing confrontation, Kendal reveals that Danny killed Jean Baptiste. This, notably, did not spark as much anger from Daryl as we thought it would.

Danny finally gets the heroin back from Dewey, and returning to the brothel, he is confronted by Raylan. Following a moving monologue about how he rescued Chelsea from a puppy mill and raised him, Danny charges Raylan with his knife. But in the dark, he doesn’t see the grave dug for Chelsea and flips in head first, fatally stabbing himself. Like we said, confronting Raylan would not go well for Danny, but we didn’t quite see that coming. It’s another comically brutal Elmore Leonard-esque scene.

Alicia Witt as Wendy Crowe and Michael Rapaport as Darryl Crowe, Jr.

Alicia Witt as Wendy Crowe and Michael Rapaport as Darryl Crowe, Jr.

All this has been a bit much for surviving siblings Daryl and Wendy, who have as startling a brother-sister fight as you will ever see. After laying out Wendy, Daryl forces Kendal to take a blood oath to the Crowes.

Back in Lexington, Art (Nick Searcy) is exasperated with all the problems Raylan creates, but grudgingly says he will take care of it. That, according to the previews, seems to set up next week’s drama: Art being shot while trying to protect Alison, who Raylan feared would become a target of the Crowes.

It also appears there will be several suspects.

Weight was one of the more lively and satisfying episodes of the season, though it is still hard to see what exactly we are headed for, with three episodes left this season. Daryl is fairly well neutralized as crime boss, so the only question for him is whether he will get out of Harlan alive. Raylan frankly doesn’t have a lot invested in the current proceedings, though the attack on Art will likely change that.

Probably the biggest need is for Boyd to get his mojo back to set up the sixth and final season.

Share
Posted in Justified, Television | Tagged , , , , | Comments Off

Ryan Case’s John Hurt connection

Ryan Case in the title role of Balagula Theatre's 2012 production of "Caligula." © Herald-Leader staff photo by Rich Copley.

Ryan Case in the title role of Balagula Theatre’s 2012 production of “Caligula.” © Herald-Leader staff photo by Rich Copley.

Interviewing Ryan Case to preview Balagula Theatre’s production of 1984we stumbled on a fun fact: Playing Winston in the dystopian story is the second time Ryan has played a role most memorably committed to film by BAFTA and Golden Globe-award winning Englishman John Hurt.

The other instance was 2012 when he played the title role in Caligula. Yes, it was Clockwork Orange star and amazeballs AT&T pitchman Malcolm McDowell that starred in the infamous 1979 movie, Caligula. But it was Hurt’s performance in the 1976 BBC series I, Claudius that seared the  the crazed libertine Roman emperor into our collective consciousness.

Kevin Hardesty as O'Brien and Ryan Case as Winston Smith in Balagula Theatre's "1984."  Photo by Eugene Alexander Williams for Balagula Theatre.

Kevin Hardesty as O’Brien and Ryan Case as Winston Smith in Balagula Theatre’s “1984.” Photo by Eugene Alexander Williams for Balagula Theatre.

If you are an actor looking for footsteps to walk in, you could do far worse than Hurt.

Hurt’s lone Oscar nomination for best actor was for his enduring performance as John Merrick in 1981′s The Elephant Man, an award he lost to another iconic performance: Robert De Niro’s turn in Raging Bull. He won the BAFTA for Elephant Man, as well as best supporting actor in Midnight Express (1979) and The Naked Civil Servant (1976), in which he played author Quentin Crisp, a person he returned to in the 2009 film Englishman in New York.

 John Hurt at the Rome International Film Festival, Nov. 9, 2013. AP photo by Alessandra Tarantino.

John Hurt at the Rome International Film Festival, Nov. 9, 2013. AP photo by Alessandra Tarantino.

Other distinctive characters in the  Hurt canon include Raskolnikov in a BBC version of Crime and Punishment (1979) the manipulative CIA agent in The Osterman Weekend (1983), Richard Rich in A Man for All Seasons (1966) and numerous Shakespearean roles on stage and screen.

Ryan, of course, has a distinguished resume of performances too including the title role in Actors Guild of Lexington’s production of Bat Boy — The Musical, Vincent Van Gogh in AGL’s Vincent in Brixton and Simon Zealots in the Lexington Shakespeare Festival’s Jesus Christ Superstar, to name a few. He’s also developed an extensive directing resume as co-artistic director of Balagula Theatre with Natasha Williams.

And as much as he likes Hurt and his roles, Ryan wouldn’t want to follow his path too far, thus he somehow find himself as Kane, the unwitting gestational host of the title character in Alien (1979).

“Yeah,” he says, “I don’t want to wind up with an alien popping out of my stomach.”

Share
Posted in Balagula Theatre, Theater | Tagged , , , , | Comments Off

‘Justified’ recap: ‘Wrong Roads’

Timothy Olyphant as Deputy U.S. Marshal Raylan Givens and Eric Roberts as DEA Special Agent Alex Miller in "Justified." © FX photo by Prashant Gupta.

Timothy Olyphant as Deputy U.S. Marshal Raylan Givens and Eric Roberts as DEA Special Agent Alex Miller in “Justified.” © FX photos by Prashant Gupta.

The meeting at the brothel was just what Season 5 of Justified neededSeated around the table were Boyd (Walton Goggins), Wyn Duffy (Jere Burns), Picker (John Kapelos) and Daryl (Michael Rapaport). Their percentage negotiations for their new heroin partnership are interrupted when late (we’ll get to that) Hot Rod Dunham’s goons Roscoe (Steve Harris) and Jay (Wood Harris) burst in looking to get the drugs or money they believe are rightfully theirs.

Boyd is talking fast, trying to disrupt the rhythm of the room when Raylan (Timothy Olyphant) shows up with his new buddy, Memphis DEA agent Alex Miller (Eric Roberts). It seems like finally, the fuse has been lit to get this season of Justified going, and it is one of the better moments of Elmore Leonard-esque dialogue this season.

But then, in a quick move, Miller shoots Roscoe, and Jay extremely reluctantly gives up his gun rather than going down with his brother.

Fizzle.

Maybe at Episode 9, it’s still a little bit soon for such a big showdown. But this season needed something to happen, and we got about half way there.

Probably the most positive development is everyone is gathering back together. The Mexico run is coming to a close. Raylan takes a trip, but it’s not to Florida. Just Tennessee.  And stakes are being raised.

Raylan’s first scene is an amusing one. Freshly dumped by Alison, he’s drowning his sorrows at a bar when a woman who bears a striking resemblance to Winona starts coming on to him. It almost seems she might take that trip to Florida with him when she tries to set a daily rate.

Raylan didn’t want to go to Florida anyway. Turns out he just got a folder on Dunham’s dead goons in Mexico, and he wants to look into it. That sends him to Memphis where he meets up with Miller, sort of an older Raylan. They team up to try to track down Hot Rod (Mickey Jones), who is being held by his turncoat goons (I love that word) who are unaware Cousin Johnny is dead and the heroin deal has gone bad for them.

Raylan  and Miller get to Dunham a little too late. He just took out his captor with a pencil, but then he got shot in the stomach. In a tres Justified moment that almost looks like it could be a preview of a future Boyd-Raylan scene, Hot Rod asks Miller for the flask he knows he carries, and Miller tells Hot Rod to drink up as he bleeds out.

The meeting at the brothel is to come.

Meanwhile, Boyd and Ava have reconnected, and their heroin line into prison appears to be set. Nurse Rowena (Deidrie Henry) and Boyd meet, Rowena asking Boyd to commit a revenge killing of the man who killed her partner to get things rolling. It’s a sad chore we see Boyd really isn’t that interested in, taking out a weak old man whose wife died of an overdose in prison. But this is for Ava, so he soon obliges, after getting the man out of a nursing home. But then Rowena has another demand. Ava has to kill Judith (Dale Dickey), the preacher and heroin ring leader who has been protecting Ava, to get her heroin and save her own skin. So that’s another thing that has to play out.

Boyd (Walton Goggins) confronts Daryl (Michael Rapaport) about his deception in Mexico.

Boyd (Walton Goggins) confronts Daryl (Michael Rapaport) about his deception in Mexico.

Another is the future of Wendy (Alicia Witt) and Kendal (Jacob Lofland). In a confrontation with Daryl, he finds the $2,000 Raylan gave Kendal and in the ensuing fight, Wendy tells Daryl they want their cut of the heroin deal and they want out. Daryl does not seem too inclined to let that happen. He also reiterates a plan to “kill three people” and run the heroin trade in Kentucky. Everybody has a dream.

But speaking of the heroin, where is it?

Carl (Justin Welborn), Boyd’s man, safely returns to Kentucky midway through the episode. But Danny (A.J. Buckley) and Dewey (Damon Herriman) are putzing around back roads in the mountains with a faulty GPS, trying to find their way home. We also find that Dewey apparently has some profound personal hygiene problems.

When they are finally on the road home, Miller passes them on the way back to Memphis. When he stops them, the ensuing confrontation goes haywire winding up with Dewey taking the truck, leaving Danny and running down Miller.

The episode ends with Raylan and Art (Nick Searcy) having  another confrontation that doesn’t quite spark. Seems appropriate.

Still, moving forward, we have a lot of fuses that have been lit.

  • Dewey on the loose — oh, lord — with a bunch of heroin. And did he just kill a DEA agent?
  • Ava in prison and having to murder her protector for her own protection.
  • Daryl is set on becoming the crime boss in Harlan and beyond, but he’ll have to get some people out of the way. In a great moment, Boyd and Daryl lay their cards on the table, Boyd letting Daryl know he does not trust him.
  • It really looks like it may be in Wendy and Kendal’s best interests to get out of Harlan, as we already know Daryl has no qualms about killing family.
  • At some point, Raylan and Art have something to settle.
  • The trailer for next week shows us there will be a face off between Raylan and Danny, which we know can’t end well for Danny, and Dickie Bennett’s (Jeremy Davies) back.

Maybe next week will be the powder keg we’re looking for.

Share
Posted in Justified, Television | Tagged , , | Comments Off

‘Luminosity’ project’s ‘New Moon’ temporarily dimmed

"New Moon," a 20-foot sculpture of steel and used light bulbs by Calgary-based artists Wayne Garrett and Caitlind r.c. Brown, stands in Triangle Park at the corner of Main Street and Broadway. It's light grid and turning mechanism were damaged in a winter storm March 2 and 3. © Herald-Leader staff photos by Rich Copley.

“New Moon,” a 20-foot sculpture of steel and used light bulbs by Calgary-based artists Wayne Garrett and Caitlind r.c. Brown, stands in Triangle Park at the corner of Main Street and Broadway. It’s light grid and turning mechanism were damaged in a winter storm March 2 and 3. © Herald-Leader staff photos by Rich Copley.

UPDATE, 10 p.m. March 11: Driving home, I saw Shawn Gannon was working on New Moon, and it had been returned to its original brightness.

Add damaging the Lexington Art League‘s New Moon sculpture to Mother Nature’s rap sheet of closings, accidents and power outages in the Winter of 2014. The art work at the corner of Main Street and Broadway suffered electrical damage in last week’s winter storm, and it will be only partially repaired before its exhibit ends March 29.

New Moon, by Calgary-based artists Wayne Garrett and Caitlind r.c. Brown, is a 20-foot sculpture of steel and used light bulbs that stands at the corner of Main Street and Broadway where the Lexington city Christmas tree is displayed during the holidays. It is the centerpiece of Luminosity, the League’s exhibit of light-based art that includes indoor pieces at its home base in the Loudoun House.

The outdoor sculpture was designed to shine brightly on one side with users able to turn the light grid on a disc inside the sculpture, using a turnstile at the work’s base, to simulate phases of the moon.

A reflective aluminum disc inside "New Moon" was supposed to be able to be turned by a turnstile at the base of the sculpture. But the mechanism was broken in arctic cold air the first few days of March.

A reflective aluminum disc inside “New Moon” was supposed to be able to be turned by a turnstile at the base of the sculpture. But the mechanism was broken in arctic cold air the first few days of March.

But since last week, the steel and recycled light bulb display has been sitting still with its white light diminished to a pale pinkish-orange.

According the Art League, the sculpture was damaged in last week’s winter storms that packed a punch of rain, snow, ice and temperatures in the single digits. That combo was enough, the Art League said, to damage electrical mechanisms that controlled the lights inside the sculpture and the mechanism that turns the reflective disc.

A statement from the Art League said Brown and Garrett, “studied Kentucky weather patterns and vetted the sculpture with professional engineers; the damage to the interior electrical components of the sculpture was due to extreme weather and could not have been anticipated.”

This is New Moon’s second major break. It’s first came minutes after it was unveiled at Triangle Park on Feb. 21. A group of children turned the turnstile extremely fast, snapping the mechanism that turned the light disc. That was repaired by Brown and Garrett and the welding shop at Bluegrass Community and Technical College. At that time, the Canadian artists were still in town working on their piece in the Luminosity indoor exhibit.

But the artists, who were in Lexington for an eight week residency, have since left for Singapore, where they are working on another light-based work.

The temporary light in 'New Moon' is aimed at the intersection of Main Street and Broadway.

The temporary light in “New Moon” is aimed at the intersection of Main Street and Broadway.

The light-grid in New Moon will be repaired this week by BCTC welding technology instructor Shawn Gannon, who worked with Garrett, Brown and a crew of BCTC students and Art League volunteers to build New Moon. But the turning mechanism will not be able to be repaired until the work’s public display concludes March 29. The Art League is working with public entities and private businesses that might be interested in buying New Moon and giving it a permanent home and does welcome inquiries about purchasing the work.

“Viewers will be encouraged to walk under and around the sculpture to delight in the different phases and visual effects revealed at different angles,” the Art League statement said. “The interior disc will be strategically positioned to create stunning visuals from all four primary directions of vehicular and pedestrian traffic.”

Art League spokeswoman Candace Chaney, a contributing performing arts writer for the Herald-Leader, acknowledged in an email that the group has learned some lessons about public art with this project, particularly that installation pieces such as New Moon are more susceptible to elements and other hazards than, say, murals.

Despite the difficulties, the Art League’s statement deemed the New Moon project a success saying, ”LAL is proud of the enormous achievement of Luminosity and thrilled that New Moon has already and will continue to meaningfully engage thousands of community members with quality public art.”

Share
Posted in Lexington Art League, Visual arts | Tagged , , , , , , | Comments Off

‘Justified’ recap: ‘Whistle Past the Graveyard’

JUSTIFIED -- Whistle Past the Graveyard -- Episode 508 (Airs Tuesday, March 4, 10:00 pm e/p -- Pictured: (L-R)  Damon Herriman as Dewey Crowe, A.J. Buckley as Danny Crowe, Michael Rapaport as Daryl Crowe, Jr. -- CR: Prashant Gupta/FX

Dewey (Damon Herriman), Danny (A.J. Buckley) and Daryl Crowe (Michael Rapaport) in “Whistle Past the Graveyard,” the eighth episode in season five of “Justified.” © FX photos by Prashant Gupta.

Tuesday night’s episode of Justified, Whistle Past the Graveyard, seems to have moved this season forward, though it is not clear how.

Boyd (Walton Goggins) and the Crowes spend the episode down in Mexico, where there planned ambush of Johnny’s men has gone terribly wrong. Mr. Yoon is ready to break off their arrangement after Johnny and all his men were killed on Mexican soil, which Yoon said was a no-no. But Boyd talks them into continuing. They just have to take the bodies of Johnny and his men back to the United States.

It’s a plan that has its hitches. The Crowes get kind of tired of riding in the back of the truck with heroin and corpses in the hot Mexican sun. And eventually, the group is stopped by Mexican police who shake them down for a few thousand dollars to not arrest them. But they do take their truck … filled with the bodies.

All the while, Daryl (Michael Rapaport) is talking about a partnership with Boyd, about making him family. He also has a plan to get them out of Mexico, but it appears that plan is a double cross. Boyd’s Spanish-speaking sideman overhears some of the Mexicans Daryl has been dealing with talking about calling someone down the road.  When we last see Boyd, he gets into a car with Daryl en route to what will most likely be another sticky situation.

Meanwhile, in prison, Ava (Joelle Carter) seems to be clearing the path to get drugs into the pen through a nurse. But she needs a supplier, aka Boyd, who has been in Mexico — far from Kentucky — getting delayed and delayed.

JUSTIFIED -- Whistle Past the Graveyard -- Episode 508 (Airs Tuesday, March 4, 10:00 pm e/p -- Pictured: (L-R) Timothy Olyphant as Deputy U.S. Marshal Raylan Givens,   Alicia Witt as Wendy Crowe -- CR: Prashant Gupta/FX

Raylan Givens (Timothy Olyphant)  and Wendy Crowe (Alicia Witt).

Back in Kentucky, Raylan (Timothy Olyphant) is anxious to take his blonde social worker girlfriend Alison (Amy Smart) down to Florida so he can watch her parade around in a new Victoria’s Secret bikini. But Raylan gets a panicked phone call from Wendy Crowe (Alicia Witt): Kendal (Jacob Lofland) has been taken by “Uncle Jack” (Kyle Bornheimer) who Kendal called in the last episode. And there’s a guy, Michael (William Forsythe), on Jack’s tail that he apparently owes money. Jack initially comes across as cool, but the visual cue of his broken sunglasses and his quickly changing stories tell you something is wrong.

And it is. Jack got into gambling trouble with Michael’s son. Wendy, who it turns out is Kendal’s mom, has Raylan trying to chase them down before something bad happens to Kendal. She strings Raylan along, promising him dirt on her brother, Daryl. But after Raylan unceremoniously arrests both Jack and Michael, it turns out Wendy’s got nothing more than they were in Mexico.

As they part, Raylan gives Kendal the money he was going to use to go to Florida, and gives him a talk about overcoming his lousy upbringing, something we all know Raylan is familiar with. It signals some kind of paternal fire has been lit in Raylan. But is it for his wife and daughter in Florida, or Wendy and her son?

As the episode ends, we do get the current girlfriend out of the way. Alison tells Raylan she’s breaking it off. Maybe Raylan has become too much of a problem. Maybe she sees something in Raylan’s attentions he hasn’t seen yet.

Here’s what we know: We have five episodes left this season. It’s time for Justified to stop wandering around and get on with the endgame.

This post was corrected to accurately reflect what the Mexican police took from Boyd and the Crowes.

Share
Posted in Justified, Television | Tagged , , , , | Comments Off

2014 Forecastle Festival features Beck and Jack White

Jack White performs at KROQ Almost Acoustic Christmas on Sunday, Dec. 9, 2012, in Los Angeles. (Photo by Katy Winn/Invision/AP)

Jack White performs at KROQ Almost Acoustic Christmas on Sunday, Dec. 9, 2012, in Los Angeles. ©Invision/AP photo by Katy Winn. 

Louisville’s Forecastle Festival, July 18 to 20, announced a lineup today that crosses several generations of modern rock from The Replacements to Jack White.

Rounding out the top of the lineup are Beck, who just dropped a critically acclaimed new album, and hip-hop stars Outkast. The second tier is strong as well, featuring Ray LaMontagne, Band of Horses, Spoon, Nickel Creek, Sharon Jones and the Dap-Kings and Pikeville Native Dwight Yoakam.

The Forecastle Festival, which launched in 2002 as a neighborhood event, is now a nationally-known happening on the downtown Louisville waterfront. It features four stages plus attractions like a Bourbon Lodge and late-night performances. Some other highlights of the lineup include guitarist Gary Clark Jr., Jason Isbell and The 400 Unit, JJ Grey and Mofro and Hurray for the Riff Raff, who are getting a lot of love for their new album, Small Town Heroes. Some locally significant bookings, according to the Courier-Journal’s Jeffrey Lee Puckett, include the reunion of Louisville’s Slint — Spoon and the Louisville debut of Spanish Gold, an all-star trio featuring My Morning Jacket’s Patrick Hallahan on drums. Click here for the complete lineup. A limited number of weekend passes go on sale Friday and day passes will be available in April. Click here for ticket information.

Unlike last year, Forecastle will not compete directly with Cincinnati’s similarly-minded Bunbury Festival, which announced its lineup late last month.

 

 

Share
Posted in Louisville, Music | Tagged , , , , , | Comments Off

Listening to … Sundy Best, ‘Bring Up the Sun’

 

Prestonsburg natives Kris Bentley and Nick Jamerson are Sundy Best, a Lexington-based band that is gaining national recognition ahead of the release of its second album, "Bring Up the Sun," March 4, 2014. They were photographed Feb. 15, 2014, performing at the Round Ball Bash, a fundraiser for Cardinal Hill Rehabilitation Center. Photo by Rich Copley | staff.

Prestonsburg natives Kris Bentley and Nick Jamerson are Sundy Best, a Lexington-based band that is gaining national recognition ahead of the release of its second album, “Bring Up the Sun,” March 4, 2014. They were photographed Feb. 15, 2014, performing at the Round Ball Bash, a fundraiser for Cardinal Hill Rehabilitation Center. © Herald-Leader staff photo by Rich Copley.

Sundy Best‘s first album, Door Without a Screenwas geared to establish the Prestonsburg natives and Lexington-based duo as a Kentucky band with songs like Mountain Parkway and Kentucky Women.

140303SundyBest-CoverBring Up the Sunwhich released on iTunes Monday and drops everywhere else Tuesday, is designed to make a national name for Sundy Best, and there’s really no reason that shouldn’t happen.

From the songs many fans already know by heart to new tunes that quickly catch the ear, Sundy’s Entertainment One Music Nashville debut is a record that doesn’t have to ask for repeated playings.

Like many label debuts for grassroots acts, Bring Up the Sun carries a few songs over from the group’s first album including the signature Home, redone and retitled I Wanna Go Home, and the poignant Lily, now Lily ’14. But there is also plenty of new material, though live audiences have been hearing quite a bit of it for a while.

With gigs at places like Redmon’s, guitarist Nick Jamerson and cajon player Kris Bentley have established themselves as a first class party band, and the new material carries that mantle, particularly These Days with hard driving beat and rousing chorus about self reliance. Until I Met You is an infectiously cheerful love song that should fit in fine on country radio playlists.

Where the album really adds to Sundy Best’s catalog — and really, a second album can’t help but add to your catalog — is strong ballads like album-closer Painted Blue and Thunder, Jamerson’s tough love declaration that sits well against Bentley’s Lily, a breakup song well worth revisiting.

Lest you think Sundy Best is going big time and leaving Kentucky behind, there are a number of namechecks and tributes on Bring Up the Sun, particularly on Jamerson’s Mean Old Woman, a great cajon showcase for Bentley.

One thing you don’t hear here is much pop gloss. This is not a country band that really wants to be Macklemore or something.

The album’s biggest flaw is length. At 15 tracks, there are a couple like NOYA that don’t hold up as well against the rest of the material and might have made the album better and more concise in their absence. But you can always skip something you don’t like, and the news of Bring Up the Sun is what a strong label debut it is.

There are plenty of artists from Kentucky and elsewhere that want to break into country music. But few offer as many solid, accessible cuts as this record, even three or four albums into a career. There is no such thing as a shoo-in when it comes to big-time entertainment prospects. But Sundy Best enters the game with a very strong hand.

Share
Posted in album review, Country music, Listening to ..., Music, Sundy Best | Tagged , , , , | Comments Off